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Friday, December 22, 2006


 

U.S. "justice" and its idea of relative worth


A U.S. federal judge has just ruled that Iran has "partial responsibility" for the death of 19 Americans in the 1996 Khobar Towers bombing in Saudi Arabia, and assessed damages against the Iranian government of $254 million. The ruling is said to have been based largely on the testimony of former FBI Director Louis Freeh; I very much doubt that any actual evidence was presented.

A few years earlier, the U.S. government, in the person of the U.S.S. Vincennes, deliberately shot down a commercial Iranian airliner (flight 655), killing all 290 people on board. The Vincennes was inside Iranian territorial waters at the time, the attack was entirely unprovoked, the responsibility is completely uncontested, and the U.S. was without any question fully responsible for the deaths of those 290 people, not "partially" responsible. The compensation eventually paid in that case? $62 million. Well, that was the amount the U.S. agreed to pay, anyway. I haven't found any confirmation that it was actually ever paid. The attitude of the U.S. was summed up perfectly by then Vice President George H.W. Bush:

"I will never apologize for the United States of America, ever. I don't care what the facts are."


Why stop here? There's more...

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