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Monday, August 21, 2006


 

The war that keeps on killing, Part II


In the United States, during a recent heat wave, hundreds of people died. Many of them may not have had access to air conditioning, but virtually all of them had access at least to power, including refrigeration. Not so when it comes to the victims of Israeli aggession in Gaza:
It's hot, very hot, in the Gaza Strip. But over the last two months, ever since Israel bombed the new power station in the center of the Strip, the heat has become unbearable. The bombing has disrupted the supply of electricity to some 1.5 million residents; food in refrigerators goes bad, the patients in the hospitals groan, industry and work are paralyzed, traffic is gridlocked and there is a severe water shortage.
And in case there's any lingering thought that this operation had anything to do with "preventing Hamas from moving a captured prisoner" (as if that ever made any sense to anyone but the corporate media), the plant's manager explains:
Israel knew exactly what it was bombing, says station manager Dr. Drar Abu-Sisi. It's impossible to operate the station without the transformers. Replacing them would take at least a year - either by ordering new transformers or by hooking up to the Egyptian power network.

With a capacity of 140 megawatts, the power station was the most advanced in the Arab world. Israel could have paralyzed the station by simply stopping its fuel supply, without putting it out of action for months.
Like the firing of cluster bombs described in the item below this, this action was strictly a vengeful, punitive one, intended to cause pain, not to achieve a real goal.

How many people have died from the heat in Gaza? We have no idea. But it certainly seems unlikely it's fewer (percentage-wise) than the numbers in the United States.


Why stop here? There's more...

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