Thursday, June 08, 2006


Quote of the Day

"We're trying to give these people freedom, which I think is an incredibly noble thing. But it's complicated.''

- Capt. Jason Earley, interviewed by Knight-Ridder's Tom Lasseter
Just some of those "complications":

In the operation being described by Earley, two Iraqi men and one woman were killed, all almost certainly innocent civilians, in a raid on an alleged "insurgent leader's" compound. The rocket-propelled grenade launcher someone thought they saw on the woman's shoulder, which led to her death, never materialized. Of course the fact that this raid was conducted at 1 a.m. to maximize the U.S.' technological advantage no doubt contributed to that error. Ah, but don't worry. Someone is going to "return to the compound to give the family compensation payments for the woman and probably for the two men as well, depending on whether intelligence officers determined they were insurgents." That's ok then (and wouldn't you love to know how the intelligence [sic] officers are going to make that determination?).

And in yet another operation yesterday, this one so minor it was only mentioned 12 paragraphs down in a story about the release of 600 Iraqi prisoners:

U.S. mortar shells hit a house in a village 15 miles north of Baquba, and soldiers raided the home as military aircraft circled overhead, according to witnesses. The shelling destroyed the house and two cars and killed a father and his son, witnesses said. Four other people were injured in the strike, including two women and an 8-month-old baby.
Since the article uses the words "father and son" rather than "two suspected insurgents," it's safe to assume, even though the article doesn't explicitly say so, that these were five more casualties inflicted on innocent civilians (including, I'll repeat, an 8-month-old baby).

Just to clarify, as far as one can tell from these two articles, no actual resistance fighters were killed in either of these operations. Only innocent civilians. Or, in the words of Capt. Jason Earley, "complications."

Why stop here? There's more...

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